Astrology and Tarot

The Three of Cups

For the June 2020 card of the month, I chose the three of cups! The month of June was named after the ancient Roman goddess Juno, goddess of childbirth and savior of women. Juno was connected to all aspects of the life of a woman, especially married life. She was often depicted with a peacock.

The Three of Cups shows three lovely ladies dancing in an abundant harvest, their cups raised high in a toast.

Tarot cards have both light sides and dark sides, they do represent the human experience after all. You might resonate with one side or to both.

The light side of the Three of Cups represents celebration, friendship, creativity, collaborations. The three women in the card are comrades. I think of Monica, Rachel and Phoebe. The card is about lifting each other up, and celebrating each and everyone’s contributions to society as a whole. The card represents abundant harvest and the good life.

The three women in the card can also represent the maiden, the mother and the crone. These are the three different stages of a woman’s life, and a phase of the moon. You may be familiar with the triple goddess symbol, which represents these phases of life, the phases of the moon, and the realms of heaven, earth and underworld.

I have to take this opportunity to relate the Three of Cups to the goddess Parvati in the Hindu tradition. She is the gentle and nurturing incarnation of the Supreme Goddess Adi Parashakti and wife to Shiva. She has two sons with Shiva, Ganesha (learn more about Ganesha) and Kartikeya. Parvati symbolises many different virtues esteemed by Hindu tradition: fertility, marital felicity, devotion to the spouse, asceticism, and power. I can feel Parvati’s energy through this card, and I call upon her this month to help me feel connected and abundant in such a time of loneliness and fear.

So this card has some serious symbolism and feminine power! When this card comes up in a reading, it means you need to let you hair down and forget about your obligations for awhile. Spend time with your good friends. Collaborate with others on a spirited project. Be with your tribe.

Three of Cups Reversed

To the contrary, you might get this card in reverse if you really prefer to be alone right now. Maybe you’re in between groups of friends, or your usual tribe’s vibe is not matching yours at the moment.

Honor your feelings to take time alone and recharge. Work on creative projects alone. Maybe you’re over indulging more than usual, just be careful not to over do it. Just because you’re social circle is more selective, doesn’t mean you shouldn’t stay connected with the people that you care most about.

How to call on the Three of Cups

If you want to invite more happiness, creativity and friendship into your life, here are some mini-ritual, spells, activities you could try:

  • Start a small book club (seriously, so fun!)
  • Take yourself out for a picnic, alone or camp out in a friend’s yard
  • Create something!
  • Make a toast before dinner each night, raising your glass to the things you are grateful for
  • Slowly and sensually eat a juicy piece of fruit
  • Ecstatic dance – put on some jams and ance around your house like no one is watching
  • Host a virtual gathering, there are lots of video rooms out there (you can book me to host a tarot party for your friends)
  • MEDITATE! The number one way to connect with any energy it to meditate with it. check out my guided meditation for the Three of Cups right here!
India

Ganesh: remover of obstacles

Ganesh (also Ganesha or Ganapati) is a very important God in the Hindu Religion. He is the patron of intellectuals, students and authors, as well as travelers, bankers, and anyone starting a new project or adventure. You can ask Ganesh to remove obstacles on your path that are not serving your highest good.

Gansh with Shiva and Parvati

There are many different stories about Ganesh, here is a little taste of what I’ve learned. We will start with the God Shiva, and his wife, the Goddess Parvati. Shiva had a devoted follower, a bull called Nandi. When Parvati went to take a bath one day, she asked Nandi to guard the door and not to let anyone in, especially her husband Shiva, who had a habit of barging in on her.

But, when Shiva came to call, Nandi let him right in because he was so devoted to Shiva. Parvati wanted a companion that was loyal to her above Shiva, so she decided to make one. While bathing, she used tumeric to clean her skin. She used the tumeric paste from her body to mold a baby boy, and she breathed life into the boy. She had the boy stand guard for her. When Shiva returned home for the day, he was surprised to find a boy he never met before, claiming to be Parvati’s son and refusing to let him in! He gets pretty upset about this, and he cuts the boy’s head off.

Well, Parvati was pretty outraged when she found out, and she cried to Shiva, demanding he make this right. Shiva basically replaces the head with an elephant’s head and breathes life into the boy again. There’s a bit more to it than that, but you get the idea.

You’ll see Ganesh depicted with one broken tusk, and there are many stories as to how his tusk was damaged. Some say it was cut off when Shiva chopped off the elephant head. Another says he broke it off himself to use it as a writing instrument. He has a fondness for sweets; he’s often shown using his trunk to eat a hand full of modak, creamy sweet dumplings. This is why he has a bit of a belly.

Ganesh is very special. He has dominion over all classes of beings, ranging from insects, animals and humans to the subtle and celestial beings. During my tour of India, our teacher led us in a Ganesh gayatri mantra every morning on the bus. I pictured Ganesh’s big trunk moving traffic and obstacles out of our path as we drove along.

Ganesh Gayatri

Here’s a good rendition of the mantra on youtube!

It goes:

  • Om Ekdantaya Vidmahe
  • Vakratundaya Dheemahi
  • Tanno Dantih Prachodayat

It means:

  • We pray to the one with the single-tusked elephant tooth who is omnipresent. 
  • We meditate upon and pray for greater intellect to the Lord with the curved, elephant-shaped trunk. 
  • We bow before the one with the single-tusked elephant tooth to illuminate our minds with wisdom.

Traveling through India, Ganesh is everywhere you look! I picked up a small trinket of his to put on the dashboard of my car, so he can clear my way as I drive around little Rhode Island. If you want to learn more about Ganesh, I shared some sources below that you can check out. May Ganesh bring you inner peace and wisdom!

Sources:

Encyclopedia Britannica: Ganesha

Ancient History Encyclopedia: Ganesha

India Today: 4 Stories About Lord Ganesha you Probably Didn’t Know

Lord Ganesha: his birth story, symbolism meaning and practice

Amma: Lord Ganesha: his birth story, symbolism meaning and practice

Ganesh Gayatri Mantra: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dkVlpm1mKFI